Flora and Fauna

All posts in the Flora and Fauna category

A Little Late…

Published July 25, 2016 by Robyn

Hey Lovely People,

Hope you are safe and well. I had planned on doing this yesterday, but time has gotten away with me. I haven’t even caught up on reading the blogs I like to follow.

TAFE is chugging away nicely, although taking up quite a bit more time than expected, particularly in the subjects I like, I suppose they’re the ones I’m putting more time and effort into.

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I’ve spotted these little guys twice now in this same spot on my way home from the bus stop. I wish they wouldn’t hang so close to the road, but they seem to know what they’re doing. I wonder if they are the same pair that were in the pool a few weeks back?

On the Reenactment front, I’m busy getting my kit ready for the St Ives Medieval Fair which is on in mid-September. I’m really looking forward to it although I have lots of things to make in preparation for it. I’ll be camping there over two nights and am lucky enough to be sharing space in a Viking style tent. Yay!!! Right now I’m working on my linen undertunic which is all handsewn. Soda has decided he loves the feel and smell of linen and loves to “help” lol.

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“Let me help you with this.”

Progress is pretty slow due to handsewing, but I’m getting there. I’ll post a progress picture next week.

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…he takes his “helping” very seriously.

One of the girls in my group is having a birthday party in a couple of weeks. She is in contact with a Medieval reenactment group who are making available their archery equipment and I’m assuming themselves for the day. It should be lots of fun. I’ve never tried archery before.

And one last update before I go. We’ll be moving in a few weeks! I’ve been staying with my daughter and her partner who are currently housesitting here. We’ve found a place to rent together for about a year while they save to buy a place of their own. It will give me a chance to save too for wherever I move to after that. It’s all quite exciting although I probably won’t be quite so excited when it comes to the nuts and bolts of the actual moving haha. It shouldn’t really be too bad though. I travel pretty light these days,

Well that’s it for now. Talk to you next time.

Love V ❤

In Your Face Gene Simmons, Mine’s Blue!

Published September 12, 2012 by Robyn

Hello!

Since this area seems to be a haven for Blue Tongue Lizards, I thought I’d write a little bit about them for the readers in other countries who may not be too familiar with these very cool reptiles.

I come across them everywhere here – not just the backyard. When I walk Cindy (the dog) I see them poking out of drains basking in the sun, crossing the road and just generally hanging around. They appear to be so used to humans and other animals I can always get a really good look at them when I pass.

These lizards are slow moving and quite friendly. They are likely to let you get really close. I wouldn’t advise picking them up though unless they are really familiar with you, because if they are scared they do have a nasty bite, latching on and not letting go.

There are six types of blue-tongued lizards in Australia (hereafter referred to as Oz) :-

Eastern Blue Tongue Lizard – These dwell in South East of Oz and are the kind that live around here. They grow to about 30cm in length (not counting the tail). They are grey with brown stripes across their back.

Northern Blue-tongued Skink – These guys live on the savannahs of the tropical regions of Oz.

Western Blue-tongued Skink – This one is listed as a vulnerable species.

Central Blue-tongued Skink– Another vulnerable species.

Blotched Blue Tongue – From the Southwest of Oz, lives in highland areas. They are dark brown with light coloured splotches across the back.

Shingleback – Found west of the Great Dividing Range. It has a short, stumpy tail and large rough scales.

Pygmy Blue-tongue Skink– Only grows to about 90mm. They live within a very small area north of Adelaide and are listed as an endangered species.

Whatever species, the most noticeable feature is, of course, their blue tongue. Like all reptiles they are ectothermic which is why you see them sunning themselves during the mornings. When it’s cold they stay inside because they need a body temperature of 30 to 35 degrees C to be active.

They love to eat snails and slugs but will eat whatever they can get hold of, including dog food.

For most of the year they like to live alone, but during the mating season (September to November) the males pursue the females, which is why we see three-legged Louis (he is so cute, his little stump does the walking action too) making his trips up to the old barbecue to visit Lisa.

Mating seems like a rough old process. Many females carry scars from the male’s teeth during mating.

Their babies are born 3 to 5 months after mating. They are born live (not eggs) and have to look after themselves right from the start, beginning with eating the placenta, and go off to discover the great big world within a few days of being born. The Eastern Blue Tongue can have up to 25 babies at once and they breed annually where other species only breed on alternate years.

Blue Tongues can live for many years, up to 30 and like other lizards can drop their tails to avoid, daze and confuse predators.

The biggest dangers to Blue Tongues include :-

Cars – they love to lie on the road’s warm surface and tend not to move out of the way of cars.

Snail baits – cos they love to eat snails.

Lawnmowers – they hide in long grass and again tend not to get out of the way when the mower comes near them.

Cats and dogs – need I say more?

Other predators are eagles, poisonous snakes and large goannas.

So, there’s just a little bit about these excellent creatures. There’s lots of info around if you want to find out more. I love them.

V ❤

A Blotched Blue-Tongued Skink, Tiliqua nigrolu...

A Blotched Blue-Tongued Skink, Tiliqua nigrolutea , basking on open sandy ground. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Blue-tongued skink

Blue-tongued skink (Photo credit: Wikipedia)